Updated Jan 15, 2021

Farm Radio International

farmradio.org

ICTs for amplifying dialogue and development

Farm Radio International has gathered conclusive evidence that participatory farm radio programming –when it meets standards of quality and consistency – is widely listened to and leads to remarkable gains in knowledge by small-scale farmers, and that specialized, carefully designed programs can lead to uptake of more effective and productive farming practices by up to 48% (on average 21%) of f...
SEE ALL
Farm Radio International has gathered conclusive evidence that participatory farm radio programming –when it meets standards of quality and consistency – is widely listened to and leads to remarkable gains in knowledge by small-scale farmers, and that specialized, carefully designed programs can lead to uptake of more effective and productive farming practices by up to 48% (on average 21%) of farming families in listening areas. This kind of radio programming can provide tens of millions of small-scale African farmers with vitally important services at a cost of pennies per person reached and as little as $1 per adopter. Our vision is that every small-scale farmer - young and old, male and female, rural or urban - has constant access to quality interactive radio as an effective and responsive agricultural advisory service. To achieve this, we must explore how to move from a project-dependent model that funds sporadic interactive radio programs on a donor-led project basis for time-limited periods, to Interactive Radio as a sustained, consistent, “always-there” model of digital advisory services, embedded in and supported by local services and stakeholders, that meets farmers’ weekly and daily communication and knowledge-sharing needs.
SEE LESS

Stage 6: Sustained Scale

Implemented In:

Ghana, Ethiopia, Burkina Faso and 8 MoreSEE ALL

Ghana, Ethiopia, Burkina Faso, Malawi, Senegal, Nigeria, Mozambique, Mali, Kenya, Uganda and TanzaniaSEE LESS

11
Countries Implemented In

Problem

Access to information and freedom of information and expression is a fundamental human right - but many rural based small scale farmers have no access to information, research results or discussion opportunities to inform their farming practices. Internet, TV, newspapers are still far out of reach for the majority. Face-to-face agricultural extension has not worked, particularly for small-scale farmers, even less so for those in very remote locations, and for women.

Competitive Advantage

Digital ICTs, which can reach millions of farmers with simple “on-demand” information services right to their mobile phones, seem to address some limitations. But on their own, they do not provide the context, conversation, testimonials, and stories that help farmers evaluate options, make informed decisions, and mobilize for action. They are much less accessible and useful to women farmers than radio, which is listened to by, for example, 52% of rural women in Uganda. Some 80% of African farmers regularly listen to the radio, and some farm radio programs are very popular and effective. With training and guidance from Farm Radio International, and extensive consultation with communities, a radio station itself produces programs as part of their service to listeners. Program content is guided by partners, including farmers, and synchronized with cropping seasons or partner interventions. Farm Radio International provides monitoring, training and feedback to ensure quality of content and presentation. Programs focus equally on the expressed needs and desires of women and men farmers. The goal is for radio producers to create exceptionally good programs that attract a large, loyal audience.

Milestone

Date Unknown
New Country Implemented In
Tanzania
Date Unknown
New Country Implemented In
Uganda
Date Unknown
New Country Implemented In
Burkina Faso
Date Unknown
New Country Implemented In
Ethiopia
Date Unknown
New Country Implemented In
Ghana